Wade Regehr
Wade Regehr, PhD
Professor of Neurobiology

My long-term goal is to determine how presynaptic neurons influence the firing of their targets and to understand how physiologically significant computations are performed by synapses. Fast chemical synapses are the primary means of communication between neurons. They are constantly modified by a variety of mechanisms in ways that are vital to memory formation and normal brain function. With calcium implicated in almost every aspect of transmission, my focus has been on the many basic questions regarding calcium control of synaptic strength in the mammalian brain.

It is clear that many calcium dependent processes work together to control the release of neurotransmitter. These include synaptic facilitation, chemical messenger mediated release, depression and delayed release of neurotransmitter. My strategy has been to examine each of these mechanisms in isolation and then to determine how they interact to control synapses during realistic spike trains. Most of the studies have been performed on synapses in the cerebellum, which are well described anatomically, accessible and relatively easy to study. To explore the physiological relevance of various aspects of synaptic transmission we have recently started to study the synapse between retinal ganglion cells and thalamic relay neurons. In future years the primary experimental approaches will remain imaging of ionic levels within cells and electrophysiological measurements. It is anticipated, however, that these approaches will be augmented by 2-photon imaging with molecularly engineered indicators based on GFP.

regehr researchExperimental arrangement for monitoring presynaptic calcium. A climbing fiber was labeled with a green calcium indicator and a Purkinje cell was labeled with a red dye.

"With calcium implicated in almost every aspect of transmission, my focus has been on the many basic questions regarding calcium control of synaptic strength in the mammalian brain."

Publications View
Candelabrum cells are ubiquitous cerebellar cortex interneurons with specialized circuit properties.
Authors: Authors: Osorno T, Rudolph S, Nguyen T, Kozareva V, Nadaf NM, Norton A, Macosko EZ, Lee WA, Regehr WG.
Nat Neurosci
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Author Correction: A transcriptomic atlas of mouse cerebellar cortex comprehensively defines cell types.
Authors: Authors: Kozareva V, Martin C, Osorno T, Rudolph S, Guo C, Vanderburg C, Nadaf N, Regev A, Regehr WG, Macosko E.
Nature
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Graded heterogeneity of metabotropic signaling underlies a continuum of cell-intrinsic temporal responses in unipolar brush cells.
Authors: Authors: Guo C, Huson V, Macosko EZ, Regehr WG.
Nat Commun
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A transcriptomic atlas of mouse cerebellar cortex comprehensively defines cell types.
Authors: Authors: Kozareva V, Martin C, Osorno T, Rudolph S, Guo C, Vanderburg C, Nadaf N, Regev A, Regehr WG, Macosko E.
Nature
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Introduction of synaptotagmin 7 promotes facilitation at the climbing fiber to Purkinje cell synapse.
Authors: Authors: Weyrer C, Turecek J, Harrison B, Regehr WG.
Cell Rep
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Purkinje cell outputs selectively inhibit a subset of unipolar brush cells in the input layer of the cerebellar cortex.
Authors: Authors: Guo C, Rudolph S, Neuwirth ME, Regehr WG.
Elife
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Presynaptic short-term plasticity persists in the absence of PKC phosphorylation of Munc18-1.
Authors: Authors: Wang CC, Weyrer C, Fioravante D, Kaeser PS, Regehr WG.
J Neurosci
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Cerebellar and vestibular nuclear synapses in the inferior olive have distinct release kinetics and neurotransmitters.
Authors: Authors: Turecek J, Regehr WG.
Elife
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Cerebellum-Specific Deletion of the GABAA Receptor d Subunit Leads to Sex-Specific Disruption of Behavior.
Authors: Authors: Rudolph S, Guo C, Pashkovski SL, Osorno T, Gillis WF, Krauss JM, Nyitrai H, Flaquer I, El-Rifai M, Datta SR, Regehr WG.
Cell Rep
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Climbing fiber synapses rapidly and transiently inhibit neighboring Purkinje cells via ephaptic coupling.
Authors: Authors: Han KS, Chen CH, Khan MM, Guo C, Regehr WG.
Nat Neurosci
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