Wade Regehr
Wade Regehr, Ph.D.
Professor of Neurobiology

My long-term goal is to determine how presynaptic neurons influence the firing of their targets and to understand how physiologically significant computations are performed by synapses. Fast chemical synapses are the primary means of communication between neurons. They are constantly modified by a variety of mechanisms in ways that are vital to memory formation and normal brain function. With calcium implicated in almost every aspect of transmission, my focus has been on the many basic questions regarding calcium control of synaptic strength in the mammalian brain.

It is clear that many calcium dependent processes work together to control the release of neurotransmitter. These include synaptic facilitation, chemical messenger mediated release, depression and delayed release of neurotransmitter. My strategy has been to examine each of these mechanisms in isolation and then to determine how they interact to control synapses during realistic spike trains. Most of the studies have been performed on synapses in the cerebellum, which are well described anatomically, accessible and relatively easy to study. To explore the physiological relevance of various aspects of synaptic transmission we have recently started to study the synapse between retinal ganglion cells and thalamic relay neurons. In future years the primary experimental approaches will remain imaging of ionic levels within cells and electrophysiological measurements. It is anticipated, however, that these approaches will be augmented by 2-photon imaging with molecularly engineered indicators based on GFP.

regehr researchExperimental arrangement for monitoring presynaptic calcium. A climbing fiber was labeled with a green calcium indicator and a Purkinje cell was labeled with a red dye.

"With calcium implicated in almost every aspect of transmission, my focus has been on the many basic questions regarding calcium control of synaptic strength in the mammalian brain."

Publications View
Neuronal Regulation of Fast Synaptotagmin Isoforms Controls the Relative Contributions of Synchronous and Asynchronous Release.
Authors: Authors: Turecek J, Regehr WG.
Neuron
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In Vivo Targeted Expression of Optogenetic Proteins Using Silk/AAV Films.
Authors: Authors: Jackman SL, Chen CH, Regehr WG.
J Vis Exp
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The Role of CaV2.1 Channel Facilitation in Synaptic Facilitation.
Authors: Authors: Weyrer C, Turecek J, Niday Z, Liu PW, Nanou E, Catterall WA, Bean BP, Regehr WG.
Cell Rep
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Ephaptic Coupling Promotes Synchronous Firing of Cerebellar Purkinje Cells.
Authors: Authors: Han KS, Guo C, Chen CH, Witter L, Osorno T, Regehr WG.
Neuron
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Sensitive Periods for Cerebellar-Mediated Autistic-like Behaviors.
Authors: Authors: Tsai PT, Rudolph S, Guo C, Ellegood J, Gibson JM, Schaeffer SM, Mogavero J, Lerch JP, Regehr W, Sahin M.
Cell Rep
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Synaptotagmin 7 Mediates Both Facilitation and Asynchronous Release at Granule Cell Synapses.
Authors: Authors: Turecek J, Regehr WG.
J Neurosci
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Silk Fibroin Films Facilitate Single-Step Targeted Expression of Optogenetic Proteins.
Authors: Authors: Jackman SL, Chen CH, Chettih SN, Neufeld SQ, Drew IR, Agba CK, Flaquer I, Stefano AN, Kennedy TJ, Belinsky JE, Roberston K, Beron CC, Sabatini BL, Harvey CD, Regehr WG.
Cell Rep
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Retraction: Protein kinase C is a calcium sensor for presynaptic short-term plasticity.
Authors: Authors: Fioravante D, Chu Y, de Jong AP, Leitges M, Kaeser PS, Regehr WG.
Elife
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Synaptotagmin 7 confers frequency invariance onto specialized depressing synapses.
Authors: Authors: Turecek J, Jackman SL, Regehr WG.
Nature
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The Mechanisms and Functions of Synaptic Facilitation.
Authors: Authors: Jackman SL, Regehr WG.
Neuron
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